Corn

Invite your sweet tooth to dinner and celebrate the dog days with a couple rounds of corn on the cob.

The fresher, the better! Sweet corn contains a greater ratio of sugar to starch than any other vegetable but those sugars don’t stick around – up to 25% can be lost in the first 24 hours after harvest. Corn has been staple of the Americas for countless centuries. In fact, fossilized remains of corn have been dated back 80,000 years old. One of the three sisters (corn, beans, squash), corn was at the center of Native American agrarian society. Second only to rice, in worldwide cultivation, corn comes in five primary varieties and sweet corn is the most popular.  The kernels, each a solitary burst of sweet, are generally yellow or white or a mixture thereof. When corn is in season, it is a welcome addition to almost any summer recipe. Hot or cold, dried or fried – sweet corn reins supreme when the dog days of summer stroll by.

Storage

Select ears of corn that are bright in color and feel firm and perky in your hand. Silks should be slightly sticky — never dry or brittle. Avoid ears with yellowing husks or that feel light for their size. Store in the refrigerator for up to two days.